Grow room flooded, odd growth.

Discussion in 'CONTAMINATION' started by Maz804, Sep 2, 2021.

  1. Maz804

    Maz804 New Member

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    So my grow room flooded (thanks Ida). Bunch of equipment definitely now demised and my Martha is out of commission for a good while. Luckily, I only had this little box in it at the time. It was put into fruiting condition about 10 days ago. The power was off here for the past 24 hours and I wasn't able to venture into my 200+ year old basement until the waters receded. I moved the "cake" into a mono tub but I'm curious about an odd looking growth on it, with any luck someone else might have a better clue as to what's going on. I will say it's white, actually feels like a mushroom, firm but quite porous, almost sponge like. First image is of the growth today, second and third pictures are from 10-12 days ago when I initially put it into fruiting. Humidity was at 97%, FAE was a gentle constant in the Martha and temp was held at 71-72F. Species is P. Cubensis.

    -maz

    Image.jpeg IMG_0516.jpg IMG_0520.jpg
     
  2. the_chosen_one

    the_chosen_one there are no answers.. only choices Moderator Mushroom Doctor

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    Sorry to hear about your troubles. Glad you're ok.
    The first pic is wet bubble infection. I'm being lazy at the moment so...

    A cut & paste from the American Mushroom Institute...

    This fungal disease is caused by the fungus Mycogyne perniciosa and is common although often not serious. When it develops early in a crop and if not controlled, it can cause considerable crop loss.

    The most characteristic symptom is the development of distorted masses of mushroom tissue, which are initially white and fluffy but become brown as they age and decay.

    Small amber to dark brown drops of liquid develop on the surface of the undifferentiated tissue, especially in conditions of very high relative humidity. It is this wet decay and amber drops on the affected mushroom tissue that gives this disease its common name.

    In dry conditions, the distorted masses remain dry in appearance and are very similar to that of Verticillium Disease or dry bubble.

    In addition to the distortion symptom, small fluffy white patches of mycelium may occur on the surface of the casing, following the infection of a developing mushroom below the casing surface.

    When mature mushrooms are attached, only the base of the stalk may be affected and the cap can develop symptoms on only part of the gills. The later infection, the less distortion.

    Contaminated casing material is a common primary source of the pathogen. Generally, symptoms in the first flush indicate contamination of the casing. Compost is not an important source. Spores may survive on the surfaces of buildings or may be carried by crop debris and in this way can contaminate crops.

    The disease spreads by spores and mycelium. Once the pathogen is established in the crop, the main means of spread is by water splash and by excess water running off the beds. Pickers may also spread the pathogen on their hands, on tools, cartons and clothing.

    One of the most important means of control is the elimination of the primary sources of the pathogen. This can be achieved by paying strict attention to hygiene. It is particularly important to ensure that the casing materials are stored in a area that will not become contaminated by debris and dust from the growing rooms. Once the pathogen becomes established in a crop, spread must be minimized. All affected mushrooms should be carefully removed. Covering affected mushrooms with a cup, alcohol or salt is an alternative to removing them. As water is one of the most important methods of spread, this should be done only after all diseased mushrooms have been removed. If plastic pots are used to minimize spread, it is essential to push the pots well into the casing, preferably down as far as the compost surface, otherwise sideways drainage of water will disperse the spores of the pathogen.
     
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  3. Maz804

    Maz804 New Member

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    Cool! At least it’s mot some pedestrian form of contamination! Sounds like I can sterilize my scalpel and attempt to take care of it rather easily before I add some additional moisture to its new home. After everything it’s been through I’m just hoping it’s salvageable, I don’t really care about the quantity, the process of nurturing and taking it through the rest of its journey in life is far more interesting to me. This has been a long trek. It started out as a sliver of dried up PE a buddy gave me from another cultivator in Maine, a wild and slightly mad old lady from his account. A few agar transfers, a cross with fresh GT mycelium on the other half, the interwoven boundary grown out on agar etc etc. More of a fun mystery project just to see what would fruit. Been months of little cautious steps along the way! This is the last surviving block out of 9. The other 8 were discarded outside for various more obvious issues. A solo fruit (praying for more though) would mean the world at this point! And if not, it’s been a great learning experience none the less. Thanks for the cut and paste!

    -maz
     
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