(P. Pulmonarious / Pleurotus sajor-caju?) Surprise

Discussion in 'HUNTING & IDENTIFICATION' started by cubistic, Nov 24, 2016.

  1. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    Hey everyone,

    I have happily been busy trying to grow edibles for the past couple of months from spores I got from everythingmushrooms.com
    Basically from spore print > agar > grain jar > various experimental substrates

    The species I am fiddling with atm. are phoenix oyster, golden oyster, enoki & white elm

    Yesterday I had a nice surprise outside in the garden, as one of my "banana tree support logs" had a bunch of white growth on it.

    I couldn't quite believe it, but it seems like my garden outraced all of my indoor grow tent efforts, and I am pretty sure it is phoenix oyster I am looking at.
    As I've never seen phoenix oysters before I'd appreciate your opinions, but I did toss out some moldy agar dishes in roughly that area, perhaps 6 weeks ago


    2016-11-24 Pulmarious log1.jpg 2016-11-24 Pulmarious log2.jpeg 2016-11-24 Pulmarious log3.jpeg


    The search goes on!
     
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  2. muskie

    muskie Myco-Backpacker Mushroom Doctor Expert Identifier

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    Looks like P. pulmonarius to me

    Should have an anise smell.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2016
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  3. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    I don't remember the anise smell being this mild, but I tasted the big one, and yes, it sure does taste like oyster mushroom :)

    I've cut my hedge which has quite a few of these logs standing vertically. I cut a few of them above ground and let them remain and stand vertically in the hedge. In a months time I will inoculate them with dowels. Them being inside the hedge will provide shade and still/moist air, so could turn out well, and that experiment is even more on the agenda now that I see the pulmonaris like them :)
     
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  4. muskie

    muskie Myco-Backpacker Mushroom Doctor Expert Identifier

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    Nice.

    What kind of wood are those logs?
     
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  5. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    I have been trying to get the right name for you, and it took a little while before I got it.
    I am told its a "Ficus Alii", or Alii Fig
     
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  6. muskie

    muskie Myco-Backpacker Mushroom Doctor Expert Identifier

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    Thanks!

    I just looked at it. Very cool. I always like to know what mushrooms grow on what wood!
     
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  7. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    I like to experiment and try to make things grow in the environment I am in.
    I'll be making up dowels soon, and hope in a months time when they are ready, that some of these Alii fig logs I've cut have died out enouigh for inoculation

    Also, banana trees has a leaf/stem structure that looks absolutely <perfect> for mushroom growing, waiting for my next banana cluster to mature so I can recycle the leaf material
     
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  8. muskie

    muskie Myco-Backpacker Mushroom Doctor Expert Identifier

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    Right on, man.

    Fresh cut wood that hasn't sat around too long is the best for inoculation.

    Ideally, you want to inoculate wood between 0 and 2 weeks from the day it has been cut. It helps avoid other weed fungi from taking hold before you inoculate and insures the correct log moisture is there.

    The moisture level of a fresh cut log is ideal for spawn run after inoculation.

    Normally, I inoculate logs the same day I cut the tree!

    This is a handy list with links to almost any kind of edible mushroom cultivation outdoors. It's the latest, greatest information available. Within the guide titled, Best Management Practices for Log-Based Shiitake Cultivation are some great guidelines to follow for log inoculation and management, even for growing oysters on logs.

    http://blogs.cornell.edu/mushrooms/factsheets/
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2016
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  9. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    I inoculated some freshly cut ficus alii cut logs with sawdust spawn and sealed up with beeswax. I am getting an inoculation tool for future use :)


    2K16-Autumn 2086.JPG Freshly drilled holes

    2K16-Autumn 2091.JPG And this is after sealing up with wax

    2K16-Autumn 2085.JPG About $2 for a bar of beeswax - I'll be looking at less costly alternatives
     
  10. cubistic

    cubistic Active Member Supporter

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    Thank you Muskie, I forgot to say thanks - I've cut down on the procrasti, erh, I mean waiting time after reading your post, and been through a few guides and video on the link you posted already, good stuff!


     
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  11. muskie

    muskie Myco-Backpacker Mushroom Doctor Expert Identifier

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    You're welcome, man.

    Thanks for posting your work. Looks great!

    Yeah, those tools do make it a lot easier, especially if you are doing very many logs up.

    I've used a funnel and a stick to push sawdust into the holes before. It wasn't too bad but I wouldn't want to do too many that way. :)