These jars have been stalled here for 10 days or so. Is there a problem?

Discussion in 'MUSHROOM CULTIVATION' started by That_Idiot, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. That_Idiot

    That_Idiot Member Supporter

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    These BRF jars of p. azurescens were inoculated from spores on Jan 29. They progressed nicely until about 10 days ago, after which there had been little to no noticeable growth.

    The house typically dips below 60 at night and never gets above 70 F during the winter, so they are kept waist deep in water that is maintained at 82 F or so.

    The jars will to go to a tub of wood chips after this. It is planned to inoculate an outdoor bed with those chips.

    Should I be concerned? How much longer would you expect it to take to colonize fully?

    It feels like I may not have enough time for the bulk substrate chips to grow out in time to run a bed for a fall fruiting. How bad an idea would it be to inoculate the chips with these jars right now before they're fully colonized?



    jar1.jpg jar2.jpg jar3.jpg
     
  2. Major Myc

    Major Myc pasture pirate Mushroom Doctor

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    Take a sharpie and trace around the edges of the growth, that will help you see if it's stalled or just slowed. Usually though when they stall out it's a contaminant, since you'd see ten days worth of mold I'd guess your's is bacterial.
     
  3. That_Idiot

    That_Idiot Member Supporter

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    If it is bacterial, is it a complete lost cause? Or could I go to Wood chips and expect a positive outcome?
     
  4. kdmmontana

    kdmmontana Well-Known Member

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    I will upload some lost jars of death with bacteria for you for comparison!
    These jars have been stalled for 4 weeks and are dead, notice the ropey mycelium and thin growth!

    this is what it looks like when it goes wrong:)

    cheers!

    DSCF0202.JPG DSCF0201.JPG DSCF0199.JPG DSCF0198.JPG

    Notice pic 2 and the circular spot where no growth is seen:)

    Hope this helps! Also bacteria smells like shit so thats always a way to tell but its interesting how the mycelium keeps fighting:)
     
  5. That_Idiot

    That_Idiot Member Supporter

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    OK. This is disappointing. BUT - and I know this isn't ideal, but I'm desperate - can it be salvaged? I'm afraid I've got 2 agar jars in the same state.

    I have experience with peroxide on wood pellets. I got really good results with oysters and lion's mane with good spawn. BUT suppose I prepared some pellets/sawdust like this and then used the "bacterially contaminated" BRF or Agar to inoculate that. What are the chances that it would kill the bacteria and leave the mycelium to grow. I already know that mycelium can grow under these conditions.

    Also, I have some other prepared agar jars I could try to make a transfer to, but is this a lost cause with the bacteria?

    Finally, suppose I just dumped one of these BRF jars into a small quantity (say a few quarts) of wood chips? Would the bacteria still be problematic - I mean once these things go outside they'll be competing all the time anyway. Can bacteria really out compete on wood?
     
  6. kdmmontana

    kdmmontana Well-Known Member

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    Im no expert on agar or wood or any of that but as I understand it, it is possible to transfer healthy mycelium many times onto new agar plates and finally reach a clean culture
    but agar is also susceptible to contamination etc. If I was growing a BRF Jar and it stalls and fails, its no use other than to start over IMO but its of course up to you.

    Whatever spawn contaminates with will grow onto new medium yes and it will hamper fruiting.
    Bulk can of course be restarted with agar and so on.
     
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  7. n0j0y

    n0j0y Active Member Supporter

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    One of the key goals is to give your grow as big of a head start as possible so it can do it's thing before other things can compete. If you are having colonizing issues then that head start is likely already falling behind.

    It won't save the jars but if you grab chunks that Look good and transfer them to agar and monitor closely and transfer off clean growth there before other contams start to show and do this a few times, you can likely isolate clean culture and start from there.
     
  8. That_Idiot

    That_Idiot Member Supporter

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    For the historical record, I made a few transfers from the suspect agar jars. There was no evidence of mold, only a question of bacterial colonization. Then I prepared 5lbs of hardwood pellets a-la Rush Wayne peroxide method, gave the agar plates a quick rinse with peroxide solution, and scraped the bulk of the surfaces of the agar jars into the prepped sawdust.

    I've now got 4 3-is lb bags of sawdust/mycelium, what - sawdust spawn? bulk substrate? - whatever - growing while I wait to isolate clean mycelium.

    My experimental thinking was that the peroxide will kill or at least check the growth of any bacterial contaminants while the mycelium will adapt and proliferate. I'll keep you posted.

    UPDATE: 3/23/18 - The mycelium have adapted to the peroxide and have begun colonizing the peroxide-treated hardwood pellet sawdust substrate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2018