Vectors Of Contamination Revisited/Propagation

Discussion in 'ADVANCED MYCOLOGY' started by Gremlinchode, Sep 20, 2015.

  1. Gremlinchode

    Gremlinchode Member

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    After reading "the six vectors of contamination" In Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms (ch 10 P.75)
    I had some thoughts about vectors of spore dispersal and propagation. My first grow was a Stropharia Rugosoannulata (garden giant) indoor mushroom kit, I had many troubles and eventually broke up the kit and made a patch outside that had a few cycles of fruiting. Slugs were attracted to the mushrooms and destroyed some before they had a chance to sporulate. I did not want to interfere with the natural order by killing or preventing the slugs access to the mushroom patch, I had this gut feeling that slugs may be valuable to mushrooms as vectors of spore dispersal and eventually found at least one article to back up my "feeling". (Such as spores attached to their bodies or passing through their digestive system unharmed ect)
    http://www.fungimag.com/summer 2010 articles/Slugs & Mushrooms.pdf
    The other thought is that as they travel thought a mushroom patch it would be possible for tiny fragments of mycelium to attach to their bodies and be carried to a new location. Through less controls is it possible to aid in the creation of a hardier feral strain? How long can spores lie dormant in soil? If you introduce mycelium from a species that is non native to your area and would not fruit outdoors, is it possible for the mycelium to continue vegetative growth? I am by no means a mycologist, more of a wannabe but I have lots of questions and if anybody has answers I would be happy to read them. I apologize if my questions are childish or ignorant. Dang after the post I noticed the experimental mycology forum, maybe it was better suited there?

    :gremlin:
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2015
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  2. ivangrozny

    ivangrozny Active Member

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    As far as how long a spore can exist in the environment, it is entirely dependent on species and the environmental conditions. Most spores of the higher fungi have a survival mechanism that prevents the spores from germinating until there are appropriate growth conditions, ie; a sugar and moisture present. This is why a spore syringe can sit for sometimes years and still remain viable.

    Regarding vegetative only growth. Yes completely possible for a non-native or even a native species to exist vegatativly only. It is important to remember that the majority of a mushrooms growth is vegetative, fruiting is a reproductive function and is often only triggered by a condition which threatens the continued survival of the vegetative mass. For example, a dung lover that has almost completely consumed it's substrate, it will fruit in response to this to insure that it's genetics have a chance to be carried forward and spawn (pun intended) a new generation. Cold as a fruiting trigger would be another example. Surviving to reproduce is the most important thing from an environmental and evolutionary point of view. Many species are extinct because they did not have mechanisms that insured passing on genetics. And in the higher fungi it is a mechanism for genetic diversity, and in some lines there seems to be a predisposition to only achieving a fruiting state when there is adequete genetic diversity, ie; two genetically dissimilar monokaryotes fusing to form the diraryotic, fruiting capable mycelia. A mechanism that insures genetic diversity. There also appears to be, at least in some limited cases a mechanism to exchange genetic material between two compatible dikaryotes, although from what I understand it is MUCH less common.

    And if this sounds neat then even more amazing is the world of the mychorhizael fungi. They have established relationships with plants that involve communication between the two symbiots. A plant might need phosphorus, signals the need, the fungus translocates the nutrient, or synthesizes enzymes that mineralize the nutrient to a plant available form. In return the plant gives the fungus sugar. This hyphal network can be vast, covering long distances and often multiple species. Guess what happens to that network when we till the soil.

    If you haven't already check out some of Paul Stamets talks. He is a great mycologist and one of the great thinkers of our age, he is inspirational to say the least. And welcome to mycotek, and to the wonderful and strange world of the fungi.
     
  3. Professor PinHead

    Professor PinHead Lost in the Tek.... Administrator Mushroom Doctor Cannabis Doctor Supporter

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    Spores are discharged faster than any other substance in nature (.25 millisends). I'm sure the slugs help but these guys would do alright anyway without them. From my outdoor growing experience they do a lot more damage than help, lol..

    Here is a read on the discharge rate of spores from dung loving species..


    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080916215120.htm

     
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  4. Gremlinchode

    Gremlinchode Member

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    Thank you for the great reply's very interesting to read!
     
  5. Titus

    Titus Creative PITA

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    Great info in this thread!