Looking for suggestions for Heating and Cooling options in my new setup

Discussion in 'EDIBLE & MEDICINAL MUSHROOMS' started by squidgygoanna, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    Hey all,

    I'm planning on expanding my gourmet grow operation. I have 2 x 20ft shipping containers I'll be placing side by side. One will be a fruiting chamber, the other will be 2/3 colonization room, and 1/3 small lab.

    Wondering if anyone has any suggestions on what I could use to heat and cool the containers. Whatever it is will be hooked up to an automated thermostat. I've done a lot of research but can't figure out what would be best. I'm after something that is safe to use in humid environments, and that will have as little impact on humidity as possible (will be running two large humidibuckets).

    For heating I've looked at:
    • Split system air conditioner / heater
    • Greenhouse tube heaters
    • Oil and water radiator heaters (not sure if these are safe to use in humid environments)
    • Waterproof Greenhouse 2kw fan heater
    • Also looked at using a car radiator in reverse, pumping hot water through and having a fan push the air into the grow room.
    For cooling I've looked at:
    • Split system air conditioner / heater
    • Using fridge parts to construct an in duct cooling system (as per Rednecks Grow Room cooler thread)
    If anyone has any suggestions on what would best suit this setup, or if there's something better that I haven't looked into yet, any help would be greatly appreciated
     
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  2. FallenOak

    FallenOak Mushroom Cultivator Mushroom Doctor

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  3. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    Cool thanks man, this looks promising. Does it have much impact on humidity levels?
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2017
  4. FallenOak

    FallenOak Mushroom Cultivator Mushroom Doctor

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    Yes it does reduce humidity, as any AC unit will, save a purpose built industrial air handling unit with humidity injected downstream of the cooling coils, which cost upwards of 30 grand. Air must be preconditioned before being drawn into the fruiting room, then this acts as a supplemental AC unit on a temperature controller so it is not constantly running.
     
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  5. Ellis

    Ellis Mycovore

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    I'm wondering how swamp coolers would work for fruiting chambers. It would add humidity which seems good.
    Won't fail due to trying to remove all the humidity like some air conditioners might if not ducted properly.

    That said, I really don't know what I'm talking about nor do I have any experience in this area.
     
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  6. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    Interesting. I've purchased all the temp and humidity controllers, now I'm just looking for a cooling method. I've also looked into swamp coolers, might give that a try before dropping bulk cash on an AC
     
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  7. MorePies

    MorePies Active Member

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    Swamp coolers work and aren't that difficult to put one together yourself. Using Aspen pad not a foam one. Or try to buy a motorless model which will save you a lot of costs on a on a pre-made unit. If your climate is dry enough, they can make a big big difference. Or they might just be able to drop it a few degrees but get your humidity up air going in so your humidification system doesn't have to work that hard . How many Ultrasonics are in your large humidity buckets? How many air exchanges you going for? What are you growing? Making or buying spawn?

    in addition to your two containers, sounds like an awesome project by the way, you'll need to attach some equipment / air conditioning rooms like Fallen Oak did on his. You do not want to be putting that high humidity air through your refrigerator coils on an AC, they will freeze. Since you have multiple zones, id look into a mini split. Can most likely get a tax credit if your in the states too.
     
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  8. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    Thanks for the info Pies. I've got 2 large humidibuckets with 6 foggers in each, so a total of 12. I'm hoping that will be enough but I can add more if needed. Ordering two large centrifugal fans with speed controllers to hook the buckets up to. This will be my first large scale project so I'm still figuring everything out and writing up a plan as I go, trying to scale everything up from my small martha grows. Construction will start 1st of April. Planning on growing Oysters to start with, sticking with what I'm familiar with for now. Will be making spawn myself.

    I haven't quite worked out air exchange yet. Any recommendations? would an extraction fan be necessary or just some form of ventilation?
     
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  9. MorePies

    MorePies Active Member

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    Exhaust is definitively a must for oysters. Shoot for being able to do 10 air exchanges per hour.

    Find the volume of your grow room. Then multiply that by 10 to get your 10 exchanges. Now divide that by 60 to find your cfm.

    My gut says your humidity setup is undersized. You looked into a hydro foggers mini?

    If you have any poly tubing, make a jet tube for air distribution. It's plastic tubing the length of your grow, zip tied at one end. Then along the tube are holes out the side so air blows the length of your grow and circulates.
    Duct your humidity into that.
     
  10. MorePies

    MorePies Active Member

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    Sorry my messages are poorly composed. Doing this all left handed on my phone while on percocets
     
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  11. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    Is that volume in cubic feet?
    Whilst on the topic of fans.. Since I have two humidibuckets, do you think I'd be better off running one fan into both buckets via ducting, or each having their own separate fan?

    I have looked into those foggers, thought I'd give this setup a try since I already have all of the gear. If it doesn't work I'll look at other solutions.
    Great idea with the tubing, I will definitely do that.

    What sort of setup would you recommend for an exhaust?

    Thanks for all of your help, really appreciate it
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2017
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  12. MorePies

    MorePies Active Member

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    It is cubic feet.

    I couldn't say without seeing your bucket setup. I think you could use a hydroponic style 4" fan on a speed controller for intake air to fill your jet tube. And then get your humidity hooked up to that. The fog should be as high as possible and make it all easy to clean.

    For exhaust. What size did your calculations need?

    Saw a cool design on another site that had the fan pointed down and then there was a U shaped duct that connected to another duct that went outside. Like a trap under a sink. He could then spray out the fan to clean spores off it without removing it. Add a clean out and that's slick.
     
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  13. squidgygoanna

    squidgygoanna Member

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    This is all so helpful, thanks so much. Jet tube definitely looks like the way to go. My calculations were based off of the 1360 cubic feet volume of a 20ft shipping container. Multiplied by 10 gives 13,600. Divided by 60 gives a CFM of 226. Just not really sure how I derive exhaust requirements from that. I'm sure I'm missing something simple.

    Another question if you don't mind.. my humidibucket setup will be automated by a humidistat controller. I'm wondering whether the controller should turn the foggers AND the fan off, or just the foggers, and leave the fan running 24/7 for air exchange?
     
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  14. Pistilwhipped

    Pistilwhipped Grower

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    Smart. I like it.
     
  15. milleryz

    milleryz New Member

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    When I turn on the air conditioner, it smells like laundry room runoff. What to do?
     
  16. omarahet

    omarahet New Member

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    I had a similar problem. I had a temperature failure and some condensation leaks inside. Once we had it turned on, it started making a horrible noise and smelling bad. We had to find mitsubishi aircon servicing singapore. We contacted a reliable air conditioning service, repair, installation, and maintenance company to fix our air conditioning system. They provided efficient and dependable air conditioning services. They also gave a warranty on their work, and if you have the same problem, they will fix it again for free.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 7, 2021
  17. the_chosen_one

    the_chosen_one there are no answers.. only choices Moderator Mushroom Doctor

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    The coil, condensate pan and drain need to be cleaned. The cleaner comes in a spray can and usually isn't very expensive. Follow the instructions.
    The only thing that might make it difficult would be the design of the machine. If you have or can get, a manual for that it might even have it's own instructions. Probably try to sell you their own brand of coil cleaner. :lol:
    Otherwise, if you're uncomfortable with all that seek a professional service.
     
  18. milleryz

    milleryz New Member

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    Air conditioners are usually used to cool containers. The main functional elements of the air conditioner are a refrigeration system and two powerful fans. An evaporator and a radial fan are installed inside the container, which pumps warm air through a cold evaporator and pumps cooled air into the container through the exhaust grate. And outside the container, I have a condenser, and an axial fan installed, ensuring that the heat taken from the internal air is dissipated into the environment. I know all this because when the specialists installed the air conditioner, they explained how this system works.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2021