I would love to identify some of these mushrooms from my farm

Discussion in 'HUNTING & IDENTIFICATION' started by MountainGuardian, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    I went for a hike through the forests and fields today looking to see if any mushrooms have popped up yet. I have been checking a couple times a week for the last 3 weeks now. Finally I am starting to get some mushrooms coming up.

    I found these first about 3 weeks ago, I believe they are an inedible mushroom called a white footed elf cup...
    I got this pic just after it finished raining/snowing and it has some water inside the lone cup... Thought it looked cool..

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    early mushrooms at my farm
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    This is a large one that I found, there were maybe 100 of these between our Northern and Western forests.
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    Elf cup?
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    I later found these in our Southern forest, I believe they are likely to be a type of oyster mushroom, but as yet I really do not know, I haven't picked any of them yet. I am hoping for oysters, that would give me another type of oyster to get set up growing in bags, I am currently growing some store bought oysters in bags at the moment.

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    possibly Oyster?
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org
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    possibly oyster?
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org
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    This one I am not trying to identify, I just thought the picture turned out pretty with the mushroom in the moss.

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    Mushroom in moss
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    This does need to be identified, but it is different from anything that I have ever seen, I took a number of pictures, but I had already walked about three miles through forest and field and I had some trouble holding the camera steady, so they are all quite blurry for the most part. This is the best pic I have.
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    17363
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    There are about 4 of these honey colored things growing on the north side of this living fir tree. There are also several white shelf fungi that are being attacked quite hard by black mold just below this fungi. This fungi, has no opening anywhere upon it yet, it is smooth all the way around it. Has anyone seen anything like this before?

    I also managed to find my first three morel mushrooms today, actually I found a bunch of wild turkey feathers and looking at them nearly stepped on the first morel. They are small yet about 3 inches tall each so I left them to grow and marked them with turkey feathers. I am going to guess that one of the wild turkey hens that spent the winter at our house was eaten by a coyote...

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    17364
    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    I guess I am done for now, I accidentally closed my album window and I cannot find any way back to the window that allows me to upload pictures, I will have to spend some time trying to figure out how I get back there, I can get to the album and view pictures but I cannot find a way to upload pics anymore....
     
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  2. FallenOak

    FallenOak Mushroom Cultivator Mushroom Doctor

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    Lovely pics! Bring em on! I am no expert identifier so I can only guess at the species and genus of what you are posting but I'm sure some more knowledgeable fellas will come along soon enough.

    As per the pic posting question, use the 'upload a file' button right beneath the text box when you are making a post.

    You can also edit your previous posts and add pictures as needed using the same function.

    Hope this helps!
     
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  3. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    I am tentatively going to label the "possible oyster" mushrooms as Lentinellus, I need to find some better literature on the exact characteristics of these to be certain but I am reasonably sure of this label. From what I am reading none of the Lentinellus are reported to be poisonous, but they are reported to be so bitter as to be inedible.
     
  4. Odin

    Odin Well-Known Member

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    Great photos! The first one is bird's nest. There may be 2 little stones in it, they hold the spores. They will be launched out when a rain drop falls in it. That's how they spread their spores. The next few are not oysters. The last one looks like a morel. If you cut it in half long ways, it should be hollow. If it has a cotton like filing, then it's a false morel and is poisonous. If it IS a morel, you must cook it to eat it, otherwise it's still toxic.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2017
  5. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

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  6. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    I was in the process of cutting up some old fence posts yesterday to get rid of the junk pile of wood and found some interesting stuff on the bottom of the pile against the soil... I have never seen deep purple fungi before..

    This appears to be some form of shelf fungi, or a shelf fungi that has been attacked by another fungi that is a deep purple in color. It is quite pretty and I would just about lay bets that it is at the least florescent possibly phosphorescent. As a child I made a fair bit of money collecting florescent and phosphorescent rocks for a small museum, somehow I am able to see something that denotes florescence and or phosphorescence, this fungi has that same visual quality. I should see about getting a UV light set up again. Here are some pics of this purple fungi...
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    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org
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    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    In that same wood pile I found this white fungi growth upon another log, I have no idea what it will turn out to be it appears to be in the mycorrhizal growth stage at this point.

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    by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org
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    17378 by MountainGuardian on myco-tek.org

    Now that my eyes are open to it and I understand somewhat better what I am seeing I am amazed at the amount of fungi growth around me.
     
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  7. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    With the massive amount of rain that we have had and day time temps expected to hit into the 60's and 70's I imagine that there will be an explosion of mushroom growth here. Late last fall when I initially started studying mushrooms, I had gone out and found so many mushrooms in our forest that it was difficult to take a step without stepping on mushrooms. We had fairy rings everywhere and every tree had a host of 3 to 5 different types of mushrooms growing under them. I managed to identify a bolete growing in vast quantity as the "slippery jack" Suillus luteus. Many of them had already been eaten on by my goats and a bear, but I was still able to collect 60 pounds of them in the first acre of forest that I actively collected in. I could have collected easily 10 to 15 times that amount. There were a vast amount of "other" mushrooms, but I was unable to identify any of them with any certainty. I look forward to being able to start identifying some of these this fall. I am hoping that as it warms I will begin finding some of the King Bolete that are relatively common around here.
     
  8. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    The purple fungi may be this.... "Trichaptum abietinum", also known by the name "Purplepore Bracket" or commonly in the US "violet-pored Bracket", it grows on dead soft wood conifers.. There is a microscopically identical species that grows only on hardwoods as well. Interestingly it states that this fungi is florescent, I guess I haven't lost my eye for that...
     
  9. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

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  10. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    While the purple is quite pretty I really don't want to see that showing up on my cherry, apple or plum trees. It mentions staining the underlying wood with a darker color, that is interesting because I had 7 log truck loads of an aspen/cottonwood cross brought here from a tree removal job that I ran through my mill and cut into lumber. Some of the wood had purple stained areas and some red stained areas. It made gorgeous wood, in fact I took some sample of the bark over the colored areas and kept it thinking it was likely bacteria or fungus that caused the coloring, so that I might be able to purposefully infect logs and get the coloring later on down the road when I wanted.
     
  11. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    About the mushrooms you are identifying as Cryptoporus volvatus...

    I had a mushroom hunter (via FB) here in the Pacific Northwest tell me that he thought these were a clytocibe possibly clytocibe deceptiva.. So far they are the only one that matches the physical descriptions "and" fruits in cold weather listed as fruiting mid to late winter in California (about equivalent to spring weather here). Everything that I can find so far that matches the physical descriptions of the mushroom all tend to fruit in the summer and fall, I don't remember these fruiting last fall when the forest was full of mushrooms and I can find no pictures of this type of mushrooms in pictures from last fall ( I tried to get pictures of every type of mushroom growing at that time). They are fruiting now in spite of the cold weather, the day I took these photos it was snowing intermittently and our night time temps have been in the low to the upper 30's most nights for the last few weeks. We are at 3,000 ft elevation in Northern Idaho so it stays pretty cool at night until late June, our average last "killing frost" is May 15th. Our daytime highs have been pretty warm though, most days in the 40's to 50's. For example todays high was 47F and tonights low will be 34F. Would this mushrooms ability to fruit in such low temps potentially help to identify it?
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
  12. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

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  13. MountainGuardian

    MountainGuardian New Member

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    Woops, I got the wrong one.... sorry ...