Probable Copriopsis sp. ID Request

Discussion in 'HUNTING & IDENTIFICATION' started by Kugellager, May 28, 2017.

  1. Kugellager

    Kugellager Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Colorado
    IMG_3525.JPG IMG_3542.JPG IMG_3728.JPG IMG_3735.JPG I think these are either Coprinopsis cinerea or Coprinopsis macrocephala. But not sure how to tell the difference.

    Pileus 2-3cm in diameter and deep gray to almost bluish gray color. Starts out conical and flattens out over several hours when it then shrivels.

    Hymenium has gills that are medium-crowded and black.

    Stipe is pure white 2-3 mm in diameter and 30-50 mm long with no ring or bulb at the base.

    Spore print is black.

    Habit is solitary to minimally clustered growing on straw leftover from the installation of my SRA bed last August. These little shrooms appear first thing in the morning after rain the previous day and are shriveled to nothing in 3-4 hours.

    Here are some pics.

    ];')
     
    FallenOak, cyanazure, MB3 and 3 others like this.
  2. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    2,949
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ohio
    I suggest Coprinopsis lagopus
     
    MB3 and Ratatoskr like this.
  3. Kugellager

    Kugellager Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Colorado
    Thanks! C. lagopus was one species that I originally had considered but ruled it out when I saw that the pins/immature/baby shrooms of that variety were rounded and "fuzzy" in photos I saw in my search. The species in my photos are conical from the get go and have no more veil/partial veil on them than you can see. So I still lean toward C. cinerea or C. macrocephala.

    ];')
     
  4. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    2,949
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ohio
  5. Kugellager

    Kugellager Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Colorado
    Sorry, noob mistake on my part. Thanks for the excellent link. Obviously I need to do a little more research...and get a microscope of some sort if I want to really learn to ID fungi properly.

    ];')
     
  6. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    2,949
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ohio
    A great name for it is Coprinopsis subsection lanatuli. Once you've got that far, you have came a long way. That name should satisfy even the most militaristic taxonomist
     
  7. Kugellager

    Kugellager Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2017
    Messages:
    22
    Location:
    Colorado
    So based on what we can see above can I call it "Coprinopsis subsection lanatuli" and not worry about the spore shape to partially key it out? Or once I characterize the spores and fully key it out? Sorry learning. I used to keep/ID/photograph scorpions for a hobby and in most of the difficult cases all you needed was to get a decent macro shot of the pincer or stinger to key it properly. Fungi seem need a little more work and tech. but I'm willing to to learn it.

    ];')
     
  8. nomendubium

    nomendubium scraping by, since '97 Expert Identifier

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2012
    Messages:
    2,949
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ohio
    Well, that is a personal choice. For me, since it is not something I would consider eating, it is enough. Plenty, but if your goal is to identify everything you see to species, then it isn't enough. I banged my head against the wall and gave myself a headache a million times looking through the microscope. The truth is a microscope is good for confirming an ID but it doesn't always get you an ID. There are still a lot of poorly described species or unnamed species (or misnamed) so microscopy doesn't always make an ID
     
    FallenOak and redcat like this.